Environmental Awareness

 

Gardeners are bonded to Mother Nature. The soil, water and air around us, are building blocks for the plants we love. We try to stay informed and educate others to the issues effecting our complex environment. The club has several continuing projects, which support environmental stewardship. We host speakers, to offer a better understanding of ecological issues. We’ve rallied for Springs protection and replanted mangroves. Our web blog continually covers topics on more sustainable gardening, as well as important local developments.

The Earth is what we all have in common. -Wendell Berry

 

Please explore the links and information below.

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One man’s trash, truly can be another man’s treasure. Recycling is a beautiful thing!


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click here

Page with updated charts reporting on local Air, Water and other Environmental stats (by zip code).
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click here

EPA free publications on many, many topics.
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click here

Wide variety of free water conservation publications.
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click here

All things on recycling aluminum. A can has no limit on the times that it can be recycled. Recycling one can, saves enough energy to run a TV for three hours.
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click here

All things on recycled glass. Glass can be recycled endlessly without any loss in purity or quality.A glass container can go from a recycling bin to a store shelf in as little as 30 days.
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click here

Electronic gadget energy use calculator.
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Saving water in the yard:
    • Water early in the morning or in the evening to reduce evaporation (morning irrigation decreases chance of fungal problems).
    • Use a rain barrel to collect roof-runoff. A rainfall event as small as 0.1″ can fill a 55-gallon rain barrel.
    • Water lawns no more than 1″ a week.
    • Choose drought tolerant native plants.
    • Mulch landscapes to retain moisture.
    • Install drip irrigation soaker hoses.
    • Aerate lawn to help water reach roots.
    • Replace areas of lawn with turf alternatives, wildflowers, or mulched landscape and trees. A lawn on compacted soil, may be over 50% impervious to water.
    • Always use a nozzle with a shutoff on your garden hose.
    • Sweep driveways and walkways instead of spraying with water.
Water Pollution Facts
  • We all live in a watershed. What you do on your property does affect streams, even if you don’t live on a stream. A watershed is an area of land which drains to the lowest point, usually a stream or bay.
  • Soap from washing your car at home pollutes. Soap and dirt from washing your car can flow through our storm drains and ditches and end up in our streams untreated. Wash your car at a commercial car wash, on the grass, or on a gravelled area.
  • Failing septic systems pollute. Untreated waste water from failing septic systems can contaminate nearby streams, drinking water sources, and bays. Inspect your septic system every 3-5 years and pump as needed.
  • Garden and lawn chemicals pollute. Common pesticides and fertilizers have been found in neighborhood streams. Follow product instructions to prevent over application. Try non-toxic alternatives first. Use mulch and pull weeds by hand.
  • Lawn clippings and yard waste in ravines and ponds can become unwanted fertilizer for streams. Too much plant growth in streams can use up all the oxygen and kill fish and aquatic life. Compost your yard waste. Use a mulching mower.
  • Soil erosion can carry contaminants and sediment harms waterways. Plant vegetation on or cover bare ground. Create untreated landscaped buffers, next to waterways.
  • Littering pollutes. Litter thrown on the ground can end up in our storm drains, ditches, and streams. Be responcible for the trash you create. Cover loads, so items aren’t blown off to the ground. Recycle and reuse items whenever possible.
  • Household cleaners and chemicals disposed of outside can end up in our streams and bays. These same cleaners and chemicals can cause harm to septic systems and waste water treatment plants. For alternatives to household cleaners, click here.
  • Oil, antifreeze, and other pollutants can collect on your driveway. If you hose down the driveway, the water carries all these pollutants to the streams. Sweep your driveway and walkways instead of hosing. Use apple vinegar to kill moss on driveways and walkways.
  • Oil and antifreeze pollute our water when disposed of improperly. Clean up small spills with rags. For larger spills, use absorbent kitty litter and sweep it up with a broom. Recycle used oil and antifreeze at the county landfill or local mechanic shop.
  • Contractors and service people must properly dispose of chemicals and water used during their work. Make sure the contractors you hire dispose of chemicals properly and request the use of non-toxic products.
  • Sewage from boating can pollute. Untreated sewage is a significant risk to human health and wildlife. Pump your waste holding tanks at pump-out facilities.
  • Boat and engine maintenance can pollute. Toxic chemicals, oils, cleaners, and paint scrapings from boat maintenance can make their way into the water. Complete any maintenance involving paints, solvents, or sanding with the boat pulled out of and away from the water. Pick-up, don’t rinse-off. Use oil absorbent pillows or pads in your bilge to soak up oil.

compiled by the Kitsap Stormwater Consortium & City of Bremerton

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